Fri 4 March 2016 | PhD defense Ammeke Kateman | 'Shared questions, diverging answers: Muḥammad ʿAbduh and his interlocutors on ‘religion’ in a globalizing world' | University of Amsterdam

On Friday 4 March 2016, Ammeke Kateman, NISIS PhD candidate at the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Amsterdam, defended her dissertation entitled 'Shared questions, diverging answers: Muḥammad ʿAbduh and his interlocutors on ‘religion’ in a globalizing world'.

Time: 11.00 hours
Venue: Aula - Oude Lutherse Kerk, Singel 411, Amsterdam

Shared questions, diverging answers: Muḥammad ʿAbduh and his interlocutors on ‘religion’ in a globalizing world

This study presents a new and innovative approach for analysing the reinterpretation of Islam of the Egyptian Islamic reformer Muḥammad ʿAbduh (1849-1905) within a globalized and at the same time locally diversified world.

It argues that the study of the ideas of this famous Egyptian Islamic reformer benefits from firmly locating his ideas within their particular historical milieu, situating them in his conversations with a variety of interlocutors and in the plurality of contexts to which these conversations responded.

ʿAbduh’s connections and interactions with contemporaries around the world were part of a more general increase in intellectual interconnections around the world since the second half of the nineteenth century. At the same time, his intellectual universe cannot be reduced to its global dimension. ʿAbduh formulated his ideas in the newspapers of Cairo and a school in Beirut; his ideas responded to domestic politics, engaged with Islamic tradition, and reflected his friendships and animosities.

For studying ʿAbduh in interaction with his contemporaries in a globalized yet locally diversified world, this study proposes to focus on the questions that he shared with his interlocutors and that they answered differently. By focusing on shared questions and diverging answers, this study seeks to capture the way ʿAbduh’s texts reflected the coherence of the global discussions of which they were part, while gaining insight into his texts’ particularity within these conversations.

Ammeke Kateman (1985) obtained a BA degree in Arabic Language and Culture as well as in History at the University of Amsterdam. Focusing on Muḥammad 'Abduh's thought and his intellectual context, she completed her MA degree in History (Research Master) with distinction at the same university in 2010. Supported by the Netherlands Inter-University School for Islamic Studies (NISIS), she conducted her PhD-research on 'Abduh under the supervision of Professor Gerard Wiegers and Dr Richard van Leeuwen (Religious Studies, University of Amsterdam). 


Last Modified: 09-05-2016